Keywords Abstract
Hess, Georg. "Electronic Messaging - Message-Handling: the Key to Worldwide Electronic Communication." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. The working performance of computers and of numerous online-services today are being decentralized and used in networks. The interpersonal exchange of messages and hence electronic mailflow from one computer to another is gaining an increasing significance with the growth of the numbers of PCs being used. At the same time, new low-cost forms of organization and communications are being created. Message Handling as the term for the exchange of locally independent messages and news goes, is being introduced to the individual working place on a worldwide scale with the powerful PTT-Data Packet Switching Networks and the new communications protocols like the X.400 as well as the public electronic mail servers, which are available via telephone.
Rotach, M.. "ETH Forschungsprojekt MANTO - Chancen und Risiken der Telekommunikation für Verkehr und Siedlung in der Schweiz." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987.
Hauri, H.H.. "Expertenprogramm Struktura." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987.
Smeltzer, Geert. "Implications of Expert Systems, Data Management and Data Communication for Architectural Education." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987.

The availability of computersystems for processing, managing and communicating data and expertise, does not mean that the results of these processes, will improve automatically. It also shows to much optimism if you expect that the use of process management and communication tools will enlarge the possibilities of the processes themselves. First of all we will have to face the limitations and we will have to accept them, at the cost of the traditional or ordinary architectural education. Mainly we will have to settle for less and worse design results in the beginning of the use of the new tools. In later stages, however, we will have to be able to deal with higher design quality for more aspects at the same time, in stead of the average quality, for mainly only the visual aspect. To meet the limitations of tools like computersystems, we will have to limit and structure the data and expertise, until we will have reached an absolute minimum quantity and a maximum quality of data and expertise. In fact we should strive, at first, for an “implosioni of data and expertise. Then, by adding more and more expertise and necessary data of the same quality, we can control an information explosion.

Dupagne, A.. "Teaching Machines. a Creative Revival of Architectural Education or a Pernicious Restoration of Technical Dominance?" In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. Architectural design is not a science nor a technology. Architectural design is a praxis of both. It embodies knowledge coming from a large range of varied domains, like policy, culture, economy, environmental science, psychology,..., but it must be clearly distinguished from Bach. It has little to do with the knowledge development or with a better understanding of physical phenomena. Architectural design is a creative activity generating products that intend to achieve: (-) the fulfilment of individual and social needs, (-) serve certain purposes, (-) in order to change the world. //  It is a purposeful activity intervening directly on the built environment in order to intentionally modify it. Therefore, teaching architectural design can reasonably be organized as a training for action and, by contrast, the knowledge attainment becomes a relatively secondary objective.
Kramel, Herbert. "The Consequence of Telecommunication for Architecture and Architecture Education." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. Most of us will raise the question whether or not there will be any consequences at all beyond the increasing amount of communication systems which have to be taken into consideration in the design of a building. As an introduction into the subject, recent changes in the academic community as well as observations on the field of architecture will be introduced. Technological developments in Switzerland, Swissnet i.e. will be used to reinforce the assumption that telecommunication in its various forms may have or will have consequences for the work of the architects as well as for architecture education.
Maver, Thomas W.. "The New Studio: CAD and the Workstation - State of the Art." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. This presentation draws on three main sources: (i) reportage of the ATHENA project at MIT, (ii) the experience of the author as a Professor of CAAD, (iii) the work of the eCAADe on the social impacts of CAAD. // Project ATHENA was introduced to MIT in May 1983 as an experiment in the potential uses of advanced computer technology throughout the University curriculum. By the end of the project a network of about 2000 high performance graphics workstations - supplied mainly by IBM and DEC - will have been installed, about half of MIT's $20 million investment is being devoted to the development of new applications software for teaching across almost all the academic Departments, including Architecture.
Bollinger, Elizabeth. "The New Studio: CAD and the Workstation: Implications for Architecture Education." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. Exploring the potential of the computer in the design process, Use of the computer through the conceptual, schematic, and design development processes, as well as the more conventional presentation techniques, and successes and failures regarding the integration of the computer into the thesis projects.
Jolliet, Aimé, and Richard Quincerot. "Video et Architecture." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. L'institution architecturale est organisée  partir du postulat d'une incommunicabilité de l'architecture (“I'espace indiciblei de Le Corbusier, par exemple), ce qui ne facilite pas l'enseignement ni l'exercice professionnel. Comme l'ont montré divers travaux théoriques, ce postulat n'a rien de nécessaire, bien qu'il joue un rÔle institutionnel historiquement situé. Une activité pratique de communication de l'architecture par la vidéo conduit  la mEme conclusion: bien des opportunités existent d'exploiter les techniques médiatiques contemporaines pour les mettre au service de l'architecture, de son enseignement et des pratiques professionnelles. La présentation s'appuie sur quinze ans d'expérience d'enseignement et de production de vidéos dans l'Ecole d'architecture de l'Université de Genve ayant permis la réalisation d'une centaine d'émissions sur l'architecture, la construction et l'urbanisme.
Lehtonen, Hilkka. "Visualization Needs and Tool Kits." In Architectural Education and the Information Explosion: eCAADe Conference Proceedings. eCAADe: Conferences. Zurich, Switzerland, 1987. A well-known Finnish novel characterizes the agrarian way of life by the following words: In the beginning there was a marsh, a hoe and John. John turned the marsh into a fertile corn field by means of the Finnish “sisu” or perseverance. We may draw a parallel to architectural design and say that in the beginning there was the idea of the architect only after that came various tools. Nevertheless, the method of visualization - image in its many forms - is something quintessential in architectural planning and design: it plays a central role as a tool for the designer's own thinking and evaluation, in general communication of planning, and in the communication between the designer and other parties of the planning process. Different sketches give directly visual interpretations to different consequences. The needs for the communication of planning in itself have grown along with the manifold development of public communication. Accordingly, the communication of planning has to compete with the highly-developed commercial communication.