Keywords Abstract
Chrabin, Anna, Jaroslaw Szewczyk, and Herman Neuckermans. "A Critical Evaluation of Early Stages Software in its Capacity of Coping with Contextual Issues." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. In this paper we analyse critically early design stages software in its capacity of coping with contextual data at large (i.e. representing cultural, aesthetical context, etc.). We identified 5 categories of early stages software: geometry based graphic editors, evaluation architectural software, generative and shape-grammar based systems, evolutionary systems and other systems. Calling the object under creation during of the early stages a CAD conceptual model, we will investigate to what extend this software allows the architect to experience and represent the context in which a design is situated. Especially we will focus on its capacity to allow interaction, playful interaction on our way to the design. Designers, and particularly architects, interact with the local context similarly to interacting in a game: the context influences the usersi decisions, surprises them and causes permanent changes to their ways of thinking. On the other hand, architects permanently shape and reshape the context, and reduce the context to a protean point of reference. Such behaviour characterises creative thinking that is crucial for the early stage of design. The investigation led us to the conclusions that the effective interactivity with the context needs simple rules, a plain interface and data reduced as simple as possible, especially when interaction with the context is performed during the early stages of a design process. The findings can be used in organising computer environments for early-stage design.
Pittioni, Gernot. "A World of Networks - Global and Local Impacts." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. As a couple of years ago the use of computers slowly entered studios of architecture, the development of operating systems actually enables everybody to control even bigger networks within studios or offices. Recently these local networks started to get networked themselves. Interactions between local design partners involve a large variety of problems• different CAD-systems• different versions of the same CAD-system• different methods of transfer• different security ideas• different levels of technical knowledge In the course of extension to a global level these problems in the first approach have been growing dramatically, involving additionally language and mentality problems. But in the outcome the exchange of documents and ideas improves in speed, quality and accuracy or this will at least happen in the near future.Global networking offers a great challenge, we have to give this matter a big deal of efforts to earn the values and results, which may be achieved.
Boutsen, Dag. "An inclusive 'Work-Method’ and a specific search for fully supported solutions through subjectoriented design (instead of object-oriented)! ." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. This paper talks about the hardness of CAAD.And it talks about the necessity to develop ‘soft’ CAAD.A lot of architectural adventures are stopped in the beginning or the middle of the road. Because of decisions far away from the designers or the clients. These decisions break in against some aspects of the design. Small details often kill a whole design-process.Does architectural design only belong to architects and planners ? To a “Me, myself and I”-world ? For the last 10 years, we have gained a lot of experience of designing architectural landscapes in a specific way. We design in such a way that developing projects can change or evolve strongly within themselves without losing their typical spirit. Change because of external and non-predictable events, change because of unexpected or changing circumstances, change because of the participation of new intervening people....New housing projects in Apeldoorn and Dordrecht,Rehabilitation projects in Gennevilliers (Paris) and Hellersdorf (Berlin),...Schools and hospitals in Amsterdam,...Each time very local aspects are incorporated in the different design-spirits.The networks are similar because of specific design-methods.This paper wants to explain something about this process-spirit.
Zarnowiecka, Jadwiga. "And would computer save the magic place? a bojary story." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Each city has its own magic, the spirit of the place. Not always are these “magici places commonly known. There are cities, however, for which such places are their pride and fame. Is there anybody who would not associate the Golden Street with Prague, or the Spanish Stairs with Rome? In Bialystok the magic quality is attributed to the district of Bojary.Currently Bojary is one of the districts of Bialystok. The town was first created as such in the 18th century as a result of merging of two villages: Bojary and Skorupy, church grounds and Kolonia Lowiecka known as Krolikarnia. Only Bojary has retained the old communication plan of the former village and characteristic type of wooden structure from the 19th and the first half of the 20th century. 
Koutamanis, Alexander. "Autonomous mechanisms in architectural design systems." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The development of architectural design systems that describe fully the form, structure and behaviour of a design relies heavily on the incorporation of intelligence in the representations, analyses, transformations and transactions used by the computer. Traditionally such intelligence takes either of two forms. The first is a methodical framework that guides actions supported by the design system (usually in a top-down fashion). The second is local, intelligence mechanisms that resolve discrete, relatively well-defined subproblems (often with limited if any user intervention). Local intelligent mechanisms offer the means for adaptability and transformability in architectural design systems, including the localization of global tendencies. This refers both to the digital design technologies and to the historical, cultural and contextual modifications of design styles and approaches.
Evans, Brian. "Binary Winds: Identity in the Digital Age." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004.

When I worked with the research and development of computer-aided design for landscape architecture with Edinburgh University in the 1980s, the race was on to find meaningful software and affordable hardware (outside of Caltech) which could cope with the curved line. How we envied the architect’s rectilinear form as we struggled with our rasterised grids to prepare 3D models which, through narrowed eyes, could approximate to a ground surface - albeit one de-nuded of any meaningful life form. As we laboured with our vectors, we did not realise that the shadow obscuring the sun was that of decaying modernism.

When Robert Venturi put an obtuse roof on his mother’s house it marked the beginning of the end for systemisation. Venturi opened the flood gates to a deluge of codified and hollow classical symbolism and a fondness for pastel colours. Architects soon shook off these superficial emblems in a fit of deconstructivist rationalism, but planning lay moribund in the grips of modernism – the codification of uses and zones to serve the paternalist state…

Achten, Henri, Jos van Leeuwen, and Sverker Fridqvist. "Communicating Concepts for Shared Understanding: a Multi-Agent Approach." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Capturing and sharing design concepts is necessary if we want to support the design process by means of Information & Communication Technology (ICT). Standardized concepts are important for support at the end of the design process when designs need to conform to set standards and norms, and in order to enable communication, but are less useful in the early design stages. We propose an approach that takes into account a more developmental attitude that will be better suited for design support and the sharing of design concepts. In this approach, design concepts are formalised by means of a technology called concept modelling. Capturing and exchange of concepts are based on a multi-agent approach. The whole of concepts that are used in a domain or for a design task can be considered a design ontology. In this paper we outline the motivations for the research, outline the basic approach in the research work, and identify the major challenges and research problems that need to be tackled.
Heintz, John. "Communication and Value in Networked Design Coalitions." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The advent of the Internet has led us to believe that we live in an era of unprecedented globalization. In the field of building design, we now expect both that the local market for design services will be altered, and that many firms will take up the opportunity to pursue commissions beyond their local market. To some extent this is true, but it is instructive to recall that in the 19th century London based architectural firms and public works designers designed buildings throughout the Empire. Designing for projects beyond the local market is not new, what is new is our expectation that such a task is now fundamentally altered, made easier and more transparent, by the abundance of new communications technologies.It remains the case that working outside oneis local context is difficult and that when doing so, problems are likely to arise out of cultural differences. Distance too imposes its burdens, as the possibility to meet other members of the team face to face is reduced as the travel costs increase. This breaks down the possibilities of building informal networks among the individual designers working for the firms that are members of the design team. A re-instantiation of this informal network can only be done on the basis of a model of formal and informal communication in the design team. Many of the difficulties of collaborative work outside oneis local market are problems that have already been with us a long time. These problems arise out of the fact that buildings are designed by heterogeneous groups of people. The members of such groups must communicate with each other to share information and coordinate decisions and actions. Yet they are in different relations to the project at hand and have differing values arising out of their different backgrounds. This leads inevitably to conflict. Therefore, if we are to discuss communication and value then we must devote our attentions to conflict.
Lorenz, Dietmar. "Communication Playground01." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The Communication Playground01-Project represents an experimental game structure, where new communication strategies in the Internet can be tested in a game situation. The realisation basis is provided by the first-person shooter game `Quake III`. The idea is to create personal, demanding virtual realities in which individuals can meet and communicate via the Internet. The implementation of Avatars enables the individual to receive visual feedback from the chat partner in real time. In order to create an appropriate environment to experiment, a game was developed to promote and also provoke these requirements purposefully.
Szewczyk, Jaroslaw. "Digital Representations of Values and Heritage in Architecture." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The paper presents the analyses of potential of networked media and computer tools for acting with the digital representations of local cultural values in order to describe and manage architectural cultural heritage. The classification of cultural heritage identifiers is presented, focussing on its applicability to organise digital storage and computer-assisted acting with cultural heritage.The objective of the paper is to inspire discussion about representing of “cultural identityi of digital data, in emphasize to possibilities of creating more digital tools and methods for management of cultural heritage. It is stated that handling complexity of architectural design should refer to heritage values. Generally, digital representations of architectural objects, similarly to real architecture, must have their cultural identities.
Asanowicz, Alexander. "Form Follows Media - Experiences of Bialystok School of Architectural Composition." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. This paper considers transition from physical modelling to digital methods of the creation of architectural forms. Every type of creation has constructed the proper means of expression and its own methodology. The main thesis of this paper is that a specific character of the composition activity of an architect is determined by the modelling methods. As the research on architectural modelling, the two methods of creating spatial architectural forms (cardboard model and computer model) have been compared. Research has been done on the basis of the same exercise for both media. The process of creation proceeded in the same way, too. As the start point students have found the inspiration. Each student presented photos of existing architectural objects and a text, which explained the reasons of the choice. Next steps were sketches of the idea and realisation of the model. The achieved results of creative activity fully confirm the thesis of the research.
Steijns, Yolanda, and Alexander Koutamanis. "Information systems for the design and management of transformation in Dutch educational buildings." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Following a period of little change, new didactic approaches coupled to social and technological developments have recently triggered several fundamental modifications in Dutch secondary education. These modifications have extensive consequences for the accommodation of secondary education. The majority of existing buildings is quite conventional in spatial terms and is characterized by limited flexibility and transformability. The paper is a description of a modular yet coherent information system that supports decision taking concerning the transformation of existing buildings. The system consists of spatial and topological representation of a building and its brief, as well as a matching system that connects the two.The purpose of the system is to support the management of the building transformation by providing appropriate input to design and decision activities, as well as by accommodating their output. This is achieved by providing a responsive context for the analysis and evaluation of design decisions from the major viewpoints and with respect to primary aspects. Continuity is a major consideration in this context: appropriate information and feedback should be available throughout the design and construction process but also after completion (in anticipation of further transformations, as well as for monitoring building performance). 
Sariyildiz, Sevil, Özer Ciftcioglu, Bige Tunçer, and Rudi Stouffs. "Knowledge Model for Cultural Analogy in Design and Design Education." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Almost every architect uses analogy while designing. The source of inspiration is nature, technology, geometry, etc., besides the influence of the work of other architects. Analogy in architecture has a close relationship with culture as well. Culture is a dynamic occurrence and evolves by the influence of many aspects such as technological, economical, environmental and social. In the process of design, architects built op knowledge from their own experience and designs, but also from the other designers work. Usually, architects develop this quality and ability during the education, and later by trial and error methodwhile practising the design. This is habitually done based on own conscience, intuition and experience.The developments in ICKT (Information, Communication and Knowledge Technology) as a part of broader technological developments and the ongoing globalisation,  influences the culture as a dynamic process and therefore the architecture.. It is necessary to make these influences explicit for their embedding in architectural design education of  young professionals. This can be achieved by transferring the resulting knowledge to a knowledge model by using intelligent modelling techniques. The operational aspects of design analogies to be implemented in education, research and the daily practice of designing architects need attention. This paper discusses the operational aspects of cultural analogy in design by using an intelligent computational modelling approach.
van Helvoort, Rob. "Mecano - when CAAD meets ICT." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. For some years ICT (Information and Communication Technology) has been worldwide a hot topic and, especially in the European academic environment, a very fashionable word. No matter where the road would lead to, almost any ICT related project was welcomed as the next step towards a brand new and even better system of education. In the meantime CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) plays a role of utmost importance during a range of stages in the design process or building project.In this situation a research project is set up to develop an educational environment where CAAD meets ICT. The first application was turned down as the proposed (ICT) technology wasnit available, according to committee judging. After proving them wrong, the second application was more successful. Even though the project was set up for local values, education in CAAD and related topics in Belgium, it was situated in a networked (internet) world.After running the project for a period of two years a list of pros and cons can be made up. Moreover, both local and on a global scale, ideas have changed. 
Stouffs, Rudi, Maia Engeli, and Bige Tunçer. "Mediated discourse as a form of architectonic intervention." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. We are currently exploring the concept of mediated discourse in relation to an architectonic intervention and urban transformation project in an educational project and elective course. Led by faculty and artists, students are offered the ability to experiment with various media in the design and development of a multidisciplinary discourse. A web-based elearning environment also allows the studentsi activities to form part of a larger discourse that takes place among all participants, including the public. In this paper, we describe the concept of mediated discourse and the various dimensions we distinguish, we present the educational project and its various aspects and participantsi roles, we consider the internationalisation of this educational project in a future instance of the course, and we describe the characteristics of the web environment in the context of an educational and software development project for a multimedia learning environment to support group work and discourse.
Lorenz, Dietmar. "Statements for the conference workshop." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. no summary available
Szewczyk, Jaroslaw. "Statements for the conference workshop." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. A STATEMENT: Present and Anticipated State of Local and Global Information in Creative Work: In Writing, Composing, Designing and Drawing
Cumming, Michael. "Statements for the conference workshop." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. no summary available
Szewczyk, Jaroslaw. "Technology and Local Values, Computer - Aided Acting with Regional Heritage." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The problems of storage of local cultural heritage in digital databases, are reported in the paper. An exemplar case of  RuralXML framework is presented. Three main groups of challenges relating to “culturally richi databases are recognised:1. Estimation of the significance of digital databases for supporting design process, educational needs and scientific investigations,2. The conceptual problems with digital representation of “the paper heritagei3. The technical problems related to the architectural databases.The most important aspects of the problem are mentioned, as a background to a discussion about the reciprocal dependencies between technology and local values, i.e. how technology supports acting with the local architectural heritage, and how “cultural significancei values technology. We claim that digital technology not only enables storage and management of such data, but it also adds a new dimension to the design, making it “locally-sensitivei and oriented towards context by means of employing digitally archived architectural data. The accessibility to information about the “locali architecture heritage is important for local as well as global design. The premises for such statements, are presented.
Cumming, Michael. "The promise of peer-to-peer computing versus the utility of centralised data models in collaborative design." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Peer-to-peer (P2P), or distributed computing, involves having computers on a network -peers- acting as both suppliers, as well as consumers of information. With recent developments, most notably the JXTA initiative by Sun Microsystems, such P2P technology will soon become quite easy to implement, in a standardised and secure fashion. P2P technology holds promise in the domain of collaborative design in that it allows design collaborators to exchange information in a manner that appears to have certain advantages over centralised systems, such as greater spontaneity, the ability to self-organize, better scalability, and the ability to handle transient resources in a more robust manner. However, it is not clear how this new technology can be applied to the information needs of collaborative design, in which centralised data models are usually seen as useful. This paper examines some of the positive and negative implications of this new technology in the context of collaborative design.
Penttila, Hannu. "Think Globally - Act Locally in Architectural Information Management." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. This paper tries to describe the conceptual connection between the larger-scale, somewhat idealistic global visions and trends in the architectural-ICT-education, and on the other hand the smaller-scale real-life activities that are carried out in the local educational institutions.The local activities are demonstrated with a handful of case-study experiences from HUT/architecture.A proposal for the future, is to establish a continuous web-forum for architectural schools• To submit and maintain their organizational and educational data• To benchmark their education content with other schools• An early version is already available in:
Montagu, Arturo, and Juan Cieri. "Urbamedia - Development of an urban database of fragments of some Argentinian and Latin-American cities using digital technology." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. The proposal of “Urbamedia” is to undertake the development of  3D virtual and interactive models of historical areas of Latin-American cities. The selected zone is the “Mayo Avenuei  including the “Mayo Square”, an historical place of the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, this project is financed by the National Agency of  Scientific and Technological Development of Argentina and the University of Buenos Aires.We are presenting  the first experimental model of the “Mayo Squarei that has been developed at  ABACUS, Department of Architecture & Building Aids Computer Unit, University of Strathclyde UK. combined with a system analysis of urban activities using the “Atlas.ti” CAQDAS software.This particular use of  the “Atlas.ti” software is under experimental applications to this type of urban analysis procedures, allowed  us the possibility to analysed a set of activities  by means of graph theory as result of a series of interviews  to the people working in the area. We are also looking to include historical areas of three cities: Mar del Plata, Rosario and Santa Fe (Argentina) and eventually other cities from Latin América as Rio de Janeiro and Habana.Due that ABACUS has a strong experience in city modelling plus the powerful software and hardware used there, we must develop a VRML customized menu to be adapted to our low cost PC equipment. The 3D model will be used mainly in urban design simulation procedures and the idea is to extend to other type of simulations of the environmental parameters.
Breen, Jack. "VISTA VERSA - Critical Considerations on the Evolvement of Designerly Attitudes, Instruments and Networks in Design Driven Studies." In Local Values in a Networked Design World - Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design. AVOCAAD. Delft, The Netherlands: DUP Science, Delft University Press, 2004. Keynote Paper - We are all involved in design.Besides being the (sub)conscious recipients of all sorts of design driven activities, we are professionally concerned with products of design and acts of designing, either as practitioners or as academics, in some cases as both. As someone who was trained as a designer, drifted into design teaching and presently attempts to combine composition research with design practice, I feel there is a need to bridge the cultural gap between design and design research. I intend to put forward the case for more designerly approaches in the study of design. In this context I would like to discuss perspectives for design driven studies by considering the following ensemble of aspects:- the matter of shifting attitudes to design in a scientific context, - the necessity of expanding the scope of instruments of design in relation to methods and insights. - the furthering of opportunities for networks aimed at bringing out and communicating findings concerning different aspects of design.It is on the topic of interaction, between the targeted creativity of designing on the one hand and the open minded search for relevant knowledge, insights and applications on the other, that I would like to dwell. Furthermore, I hope to provoke some thoughts - and hopefully responses - concerning the roles of computer based applications in such studies. What kinds of impulses have computer technologies offered, should they perhaps have offered and indeed might they still be able to offer in this field? I would like to by take a critical look back and try to turn things around, towards a possible view forward.