Direct computer programming of architectural geometry and of CNC tool pathways can control the fabrication of form and the related treatment of material. When the entire form creation and tool path process is taken on as a design problem, there is potentially a closer link between formal design intentions and their physical realization. This paper describes several case studies that engage computer programming as a first stage in an iterative design process coupled with more explicit control over CNC tool paths. It indirectly critiques the design exploration of geometry where there is only user command control over a CAD system and where the specification of CNC pathways is also less explicit. Examples of different strategies are compared in the same educational context.